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Vocabulary

To correspond with the article "A Big Boost for Suppliers" in the World Press Review Iraq Anthology 1981-2003.

All definitions are from Webster’s New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition, except where noted.


arsenal: a store or collection
“Apart from helping to build a formidable conventional arsenal of missiles, planes, tanks, and artillery, Western companies also helped supply the technology necessary for developing nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.”

audacity: shameless or brazen boldness; insolence
“Suppliers such as the British and the United States, lacking the audacity of the French, found loopholes in their own morality and military export restrictions.”

bulwark: a person or thing serving as a strong defense or protection
“Iraq came to be regarded as a bulwark against Iranian Islamic fundamentalism in 1980.”

complicity: the fact or state of being an accomplice; partnership in wrongdoing

“Some report suggest U.S. and British government complicity in this practice.”

conventional: nonnuclear, nonbiological, nonchemical weapons, include artillery, nonnuclear bombs, explosives, firearms, landmines, naval mines, etc.
“Apart from helping to build a formidable conventional arsenal of missiles, planes, tanks, and artillery, Western companies also helped supply the technology necessary for developing nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.”
Source: Encarta

curb: to restrain, check, control
“After the Gulf War, there were renewed calls across the political spectrum to curb the arms race in the Middle East.”

embargo: any restriction or restraint, especially one imposed on commerce by law; specifically a) a prohibition of trade in a particular commodity b) a prohibition or restriction of freight transportation
“Officials have investigated evidence that up to 110 German companies may have violated a United Nations embargo against arms exports to Iraq.”

formidable: a) causing fear or dread b) awe-inspiring in size, excellence, etc.; strikingly impressive
“Apart from helping to build a formidable conventional arsenal of missiles, planes, tanks, and artillery, Western companies also helped supply the technology necessary for developing nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.”

front: a person or group used to cover or obscure the activity or objectives of another, controlling person or group
“Iraq used a network of front companies in Europe and the United States to acquire technology and weapons that could not be obtained directly.”

hybrid: anything of mixed origin, unlike parts, etc.
“The result was a hybrid array of weapons for Iraq.”

indigenous: existing, growing, or produced naturally in a region or country; belonging (to) as native
“Saddam started recruiting Arab scientists...to build up Iraq’s indigenous arms industry.”

nonlethal: not causing or able to cause death

“The British government used the term ‘nonlethal’...to justify the sale of a range of military hardware to Baghdad.”
Source: Encarta

principles: a) a rule of conduct, especially of right conduct b) such rules collectively c) adherence to them; integrity; uprightness
“The arms trader merely ‘gives arms to all men who offer an honest price for them, without respect of persons or principles.’”

surveillance: a) close watch kept over someone, especially a suspect b) constant observation of a place or process
“ Saddam knew the limitations of Western satellite surveillance.”

tacit: not expressed or declared openly, but implied or understood
“Supplying Saddam Hussein's arsenal had long been big business for Western arms companies, which sold weapons with the tacit or official support of their governments.”

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