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Djibouti

Map Djibouti
Maps copyright Hammond World Atlas Corp.

Flag of Djibouti

Facts

Background: The French Territory of the Afars and the Issas became Djibouti in 1977. Hassan Gouled APTIDON installed an authoritarian one-party state and proceeded to serve as president until 1999. Unrest among the Afars minority during the 1990s led to a civil war that ended in 2001 following the conclusion of a peace accord between Afar rebels and the Issa-dominated government. In 1999, Djibouti's first multi-party presidential elections resulted in the election of Ismail Omar GUELLEH; he was re-elected to a second term in 2005. Djibouti occupies a strategic geographic location at the mouth of the Red Sea and serves as an important transshipment location for goods entering and leaving the east African highlands. The present leadership favors close ties to France, which maintains a significant military presence in the country but also has strong ties with the US. Djibouti hosts the only US military base in sub-Saharan Africa.
Location: Eastern Africa, bordering the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea, between Eritrea and Somalia
Area land: 23,180 sq km
Area water: 20 sq km
Coastline: 314 km
Country name conventional long form: Republic of Djibouti
Country name conventional short form: Djibouti
Country name former: French Territory of the Afars and Issas, French Somaliland
Population: 757,074 (July 2011 est.)
Age structure: 0-14 years: 35% (male 132,592/female 132,114); 15-64 years: 61.7% (male 206,323/female 260,772); 65 years and over: 3.3% (male 11,349/female 13,924) (2011 est.);
Population growth rate: 2.237% (2011 est.)
Birth rate: 25.27 births/1,000 population (2011 est.)
Death rate: 8.23 deaths/1,000 population (July 2011 est.)
Net migration rate: 5.33 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2011 est.)
Sex ratio: at birth: 1.03 male(s)/female; under 15 years: 1 male(s)/female; 15-64 years: 0.8 male(s)/female; 65 years and over: 0.81 male(s)/female; total population: 0.86 male(s)/female (2011 est.);
Infant mortality rate: total: 54.94 deaths/1,000 live births; male: 62.63 deaths/1,000 live births; female: 47.02 deaths/1,000 live births (2011 est.);
Life expectancy at birth: total population: 61.14 years; male: 58.69 years; female: 63.66 years (2011 est.);
Total fertility rate: 2.71 children born/woman (2011 est.);
HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate: 2.5% (2009 est.);
HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS: 14,000 (2009 est.);
HIV/AIDS - deaths: 1,000 (2009 est.);
Nationality: noun: Djiboutian(s); adjective: Djiboutian;
Ethnic groups: Somali 60%, Afar 35%, other 5% (includes French, Arab, Ethiopian, and Italian);
Religions: Muslim 94%, Christian 6%;
Languages: French (official), Arabic (official), Somali, Afar;
Literacy: definition: age 15 and over can read and write; total population: 67.9%; male: 78%; female: 58.4% (2003 est.);
GDP (purchasing power parity): $2.099 billion (2010 est.); $2.003 billion (2009 est.); $1.908 billion (2008 est.);

note: data are in 2010 US dollars

GDP (official exchange rate): $1.139 billion (2010 est.);
GDP - real growth rate: 4.8% (2010 est.); 5% (2009 est.); 5.8% (2008 est.);
GDP - per capita (PPP): $2,800 (2010 est.); $2,800 (2009 est.); $2,700 (2008 est.);
note: data are in 2010 US dollars

GDP - composition by sector: agriculture: 3.2%; industry: 14.9%; services: 81.9% (2006 est.);
Population below poverty line: 42% (2007 est.);
Household income or consumption by percentage share: lowest 10%: 2.4%; highest 10%: 30.9% (2002);
Labor force: 351,700 (2007);
Labor force - by occupation: agriculture: NA%; industry: NA%; services: NA%;
Unemployment rate: 59% (2007 est.);
note: data are for urban areas, 83% in rural areas

Budget: revenues: $135 million; expenditures: $182 million (1999 est.);
Industries: construction, agricultural processing;
Industrial production growth rate: 
Electricity - production: 280 million kWh (2007 est.);
Electricity - consumption: 260.4 million kWh (2007 est.);
Electricity - exports: 0 kWh (2008 est.);
Electricity - imports: 0 kWh (2008 est.);

Statistics: CIA World Factbook.

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